Golden Mylk

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Golden Mylk  (or “milk” if you make it with dairy) is made using turmeric powder. Turmeric was traditionally used  in Ayurvedic medicine for treating infections, as well as for dressing wounds and reducing inflamation⁽¹⁾⁽²⁾. Modern research has confirmed curcumin (a polyphenol* in turmeric) as having notable anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties⁽¹⁾⁽²⁾. In fact, such is the considered potential of curcumin, that many researchers are advocating exploring the utilisation of curcumin concerning the treatment of cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s ⁽¹⁾⁽²⁾⁽³⁾. Curcumin on its own does not have a high level of bioavailability**; however, piperine (a compound in black pepper) increases the bioavailability of curcumin  20-fold ⁽⁴⁾. Therefore, to support my body in absorbing curcumin I add ground pepper to my golden mylk.

  •  ¹/₂ tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 tbsp. raw honey (add more or less to your preference)
  • 2 cups of oat mylk (or dairy milk)
  • pinch of finely  ground black pepper
  • Strainer (tea strainer is fine)

Warm the mylk (or milk) in a small saucepan over the stove, to just below boiling point. Pour in your turmeric, raw honey and ground black pepper. Give it a gentle whisk for several minutes to help everything mix together. Pour the drink from saucepan into your favourite cup, using the strainer to catch any bits. Enjoy.

Tip: sometimes I add additional flavourings such as cinnamon, or some cayenne pepper for a little heat!

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* a polyphenol is a micronutrient with antioxidant activity

**bioavailability is a the proportion of a substance which enters the circulation of the body, enabling it to have an active effect

 

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⁽¹⁾Yadav, D., Yadav, S., Khar, R., Mujeeb, M., and Akhtar, M., 2013. Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.): A promising spice for phytochemical and pharmacological activities. International Journal of Green Pharmacy, 7(2), p.85-89
⁽²⁾Klinger, N., and Mittal,  S., 2016. Therapeutic Potential of Curcumin for the Treatment of Brain Tumours. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 5, p.1-14
⁽³⁾Boaz, M., Leibovitz, E., Dayan, Y.,  Weinstein, J., 2011. Functional foods in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: olive leaf extract, turmeric and fenugreek, a qualitative review. Functional Foods in Health and Disease, 1 (11), p.472-481
⁽⁴⁾Patil, V., Das, S., and Balasubramanian, K., 2016. Quantum Chemical and Docking Insights into Bioavailability Enhancement of Curcumin by Piperine in Pepper. The Journal of Physical Chemistry, 120(20), pp.3643-3653
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2 Comments Add yours

  1. Mariah Jo says:

    Yum! I have been loving golden milk lately

    Like

    1. gractive says:

      So have we Mariah 😍!

      Liked by 1 person

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